Thinking about the “making” movement in education

We find that making can really immerse students in custom, personalized projects, but can also be a point of difficulty without enough direction. Let’s take a look at making in the classroom.

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Google Docs is for more than just personal, boring writing: Collaboration in cloud-based writing apps

Over the last 5 years, cloud-based writing services such as Google Docs have turned boring, old word processing on its head, making it much easier to be productive and work collaboratively. How, though, can teachers leverage cloud-based writing apps such as Google Docs to make the most out of writing? You’d be surprised…there’s more to Google Docs than just 12 point font, double spaced text!

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Infographics to infuse data into classroom communications

It’s well known that getting past “just text” to convey ideas is desirable. Using many different ways to communicate concepts can help students better understand. By bringing photos, images, and videos into the classroom, you can help your students learn to communicate complex information visually, as well as help you as a teacher communicate complex ideas to your students using elements they understand.

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What makes technology “smart” in the classroom, anyway?

We hear it all the time — “smart” technologies are everywhere. Smart TVs, smart boards, smart desks, smart phones, smart cities, smart power meters, smart pens, even smart kitchen appliances. But what does “smart” really mean in relation to technology? And how can that influence learning in classrooms?

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Choosing Free Web-Based Teacher Resources

I get it, nobody wants to pay for the apps we use every day. However, there is always a tradeoff when using free technologies. Free doesn’t always mean the same to everyone, especially with digital technology. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but knowing about the meanings of free can help you protect your students and practice proper web etiquette when using shared resources.

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BYOD: Using Student Mobile Devices

According to a 2015 Pew Research Center study, more than 75 percent of teens have personal regular access to a mobile device that is connected to the Internet. According to the same study, 68 percent of teens use the Internet on a daily basis. However, this is not necessarily “logging on” in the conventional sense — it is mostly via mobile devices and apps.

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